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Brits turn down two week breaks in favour of shorter stays

Waves1The traditional two-week summer holiday has become a thing of the past, with Brits now opting to enjoy shorter city breaks and seven-day trips.

Popularity in three-day trips has nearly trebled to 4.3 million over the last two decades, according to a new 20-year comparison report on overseas travel by British citizens from the UK Office for National Statistics (ONS).

Seven-day holidays nearly doubled to 11.5 million over the same period, whilst 10-day trips almost trebled to 6.3 million holidays.

This is in distinct contrast to the traditional 14-day break, which has dropped in popularity by 28% to 3.8 million holidays over the last two decades.

A reason for this decline may be that British travellers would rather go on two or three short breaks rather than one big one, whilst budget airlines have also reduced the overall cost of air travel.

In 2016, Brits took more than 45 million holidays, a 68% increase on the figure recorded 20 years ago.

The most popular destinations for British travellers has changed very little over the last two decades, with Spain, France and Italy leading the way.

Newer destinations such as Iceland, the United Arab Emirates and Dubai have also seen a considerable rise in interest.

The rise in tourism to Iceland begun around 2010, just two years after the Icelandic Krona dropped in value, making the country much more affordable for foreign travellers.

Cruises have also proven to be a popular holiday option, and are now four times as popular as they were 20 years ago, largely because of improvements to facilities and more exciting routes.

Three countries that have seen a considerable drop in interest over the past 20 years are Tunisia, Egypt and Turkey, mainly due to political unrest.

If you’re thinking of travelling abroad this year, be sure to organise your multi-trip travel insurance in advance

Date Created: 09 August 2017

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